Motorcycles: What should I do following an accident?

| May 22, 2015 | Firm News, Motorcycle Accidents

Without sufficient evidence, it may be difficult for authorities to determine who was at fault in a particular motorcycle accident crash; however, if accident scene evidence relating to witness statements, physical crash scene evidence and surveillance camera footage exist, then accident reconstruction experts may be able to reconstruct what occurred.

For this reason, it is important that motorcycle accident victims try to take photos immediate after the incident, if at all possible. Photograph injuries to yourself and to your motorcycle, and photograph any injured passengers who may have been riding with you. For that matter, it may be helpful to photograph the other drivers involved in the crash too.

Also, take down the name, address, phone number, driver’s license number and vehicle identification number for anyone else who was involved in your motorcycle crash.

First and foremost, however, if you are injured, you need to seek medical attention immediately. Remember to keep copies of all medical bills, receipts and any other information relating to your treatment.

Whenever a serious motorcycle accident happens in Virginia, individuals who were injured in the incident may want to conduct their own independent investigations into the collision. Sometimes, official police investigations only go so far to determine the cause of a particular incident. Indeed, it is not unheard of for a private investigation to reveal a different conclusion.

Private examinations like this — in addition to saving contact information, taking photos of the accident scene and saving any evidence related to the crash — could be very important if the injured Virginia driver decides to pursue damages in court. If enough evidence exists to show that an individual was hurt due to another driver’s negligence, the at-fault party may be financially liable for wrongful death damages caused by the incident.

Source: Findlaw, “Motorcycle accident fact,” accessed May. 22, 2015

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