What are some common closing problems to be aware of?

| Oct 27, 2020 | Real Estate Transactions

Buying the home of your dreams can feel like a real victory. That is, until you reach the closing and realize there is a new issue to deal with. Many homebuyers run into problems during the closing, and these problems can even prevent you from landing the home of your dreams. 

While you cannot always prevent closing day issues, knowing what to expect can help you deal with them. Realtor.com explains a few common closing day problems and what you can do to overcome them. 

Problems with the home’s title

Title searches ensure you can own a piece of property free and clear. Title defects are issues that can complicate real estate transactions, particularly if there are questions about who actually owns the home. In other cases, liens may be placed on the property for unpaid taxes or repairs, which must also be taken care of before the property can change hands. Remember, any title defects existing before you buy a home become your responsibility once you are the new owner, so title searches are an essential aspect of buying a home. 

Issues affecting financing

Even if you are approved for a loan going into the closing, financing problems can still occur. That is why you should also be cognizant of your spending habits immediately before closing. If there are changes to your credit score, it could affect the interest rate on your loan. When more serious issues arise, such as late or non-payment of bills, you may even be denied the loan. Consider checking in with your lender a few days before closing just to make sure the loan is still approved. 

Discoveries during the final walk-through

In addition to the initial walk-through of the home, you are also encouraged to perform a final walk-through. If major damaged occurred, such damaged caused by flooding or electrical issues, you may need to renegotiate the terms with the seller. They may offer to pay for repairs or adjust the selling price so that you can reasonably pay for repairs on your own. And if the damage is serious, you may need to walk away from the home. 

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